Chef Peabody’s Squab: Part 1 of 4, Carrots

Ginger Honied Carrot Base

“Oui chef!” I jokingly bark while peeling carrots for our star-chef guest-star Scott Peabody. The man is CIA (Culinary Institute of America) and has worked at various elite eatopias, like Jean Georges, all over the United States. He now happily works on the savories at Bouchon.

The burns on Scott’s arms from toiling in high performance kitchens suggest to the untrained eye that he is a fireman with stigmata. He has the knife skills of the most holy redeemer and is here to bless the world with a delicious squab recipe through the medium of sous vide.

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How did we lure such an illustrious cooking wizard into our amateur laboratorio del delicioso? It could be the $60 worth of squab from Eataly, it could be our new homemade 0.1° accurate sous vide cooler, but it is simply because he likes us.

We’re just friends getting together to celebrate slow food and participate in the burgeoning culinary revolution of democratizing the sous vide machine.  The biggest advent of an essential cooking vehicle since the coming of America’s kitchen savior: the microwave.

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Recipe:

  • 5 hearty carrots
  • 1 nub of ginger
  • 4 tablespoons of butter
  • honey to taste
  • a pinch of salt

Root vegetables are especially exciting to sous vide because the integrity of their color, texture, and flavor blossoms when cooked at a nonfluctuating temperature over a long period of time. The carrots become ever more carroty when they are coddled by their own juices.

Scott wants to have sweet, earthy, and zippy tastes to coax out the savory flavors of the squab so he adds ginger, honey, butter, and salt to the carrots in the vacuum bag.

He slices the carrots and ginger thinly crosswise.

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I snatched up a lustrous sliver of carrot before it went under the hand blender. The color is unbelievable— it is as if fairies re-painted the carrot an even orangier shade. The flavor is so bright that I can feel it shining out of my pores. To my surprise, it has a nice bite even after bathing in 85° C for an hour and a half. No wonder rabbits love them so much!

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After getting blended, Scott pushes the mixture through a metal strainer.

The result is a silky, hyper-pigmented, complex base for the squab to rest on.

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Chef Peabody’s Squab: Part 1 of 4, Carrots2010-12-20 21:12:00 GMT

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